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Deep Brain Stimulation

Many Movement Disorder patients are unable to obtain sufficient relief through medications or physical measures. For these individuals, DBS surgery may be an option. While not a cure, this procedure may decrease the severity of the disease. Following the procedure, some patients can reduce medication doses thereby reducing the side effects. Tremor, involuntary movements (called dyskinesias) or muscle rigidity are symptoms that show most improvement following DBS.

The DBS procedure is performed in the following sequence:

  1. Following pre surgical imaging, the surgeon implants a small electrode into the targeted portion of the patient’s brain.
  2. In a separate procedure, days to weeks later, the neurostimulator is implanted under the skin and connected to the electrode
  3. After the neurostimulator is implanted, programming occurs to deliver an electrical signal. This typically takes place weeks following the implant of the neurostimulator.

Dependent on the patient, some individuals require inpatient rehabilitation following their procedure.

More Information

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